Water Alert in Grayland Aug. 15-18 and Aug. 29-Sept. 1

Grays Harbor Water District No. 1 in will be Chlorine Shocking the local water system, which includes homes in the area as well as the Beach State Park.

According to the utility, the indicated, based on routine water samples, that small amounts of coliform in the system must be eliminated through the shock treatment.

The procedure will be done twice, once on Tuesday August 15 and again two weeks later on Tuesday August 29.

Instead of the standard 1 part per million (PPM) of chlorine that the District has used in the past, the shock will be a much higher concentration of chlorine, and with each treatment the elevated levels of Chlorine will be noticeable for 2-3 days.

There is no boil water requirement in effect, but customers should not drink or cook with the water as it may have quite a strong taste during the treatment and a few days after.

Anyone who uses water containing elevated levels of chlorine could experience irritating effects to their eyes and nose. Some people who drink water containing elevated levels of chlorine could experience stomach discomfort.

The utility says that customers can use a Britta filter or other filtration system to eliminate the chlorine smell and flavor from the drinking water.

Campers are being notified and encouraged to bring sufficient water for their stay during each treatment period.

Anyone with questions is asked to call the water district at (360) 267-2411.

 

Airman 1st Class Devante Scarver, a 19th Aerospace Medicine Squadron public health technician, compares a sanitation strip to the Hydrion Chlorine Test Paper April 15, 2014, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. If the strip is too dark, the tested water has too much chlorine and the sanitation bucket needs to be changed. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Regina Agoha)

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